Human foods as pet treats by Jacqueline Valencia

You’re sitting at the dinner table minding your business on your plate. You look over and you see big eyes in a face full of fur waiting expectantly at you. What do you do? Well, for one, you have a conversation with your cat or dog and make sure you do the voice for them.

 

“Oh would Buster like a piece of papa’s pizza?”

 

Buster, of course, would probably bark a big yes!

 

However, as much as we love our pets, there are a lot of things that are great and other things that are just not good for their systems. Let’s take a look.

 

Fruits and Vegetables - packed with vitamins and antioxidants these treats

Fresh, washed, and without peels or seeds.

 

Apples
Blueberries
Bananas 

Cantaloupes

Cranberries

Kiwis (remove peel and seeds)

Oranges
Pears
Broccoli

Pumpkin (real pumpkin - canned is ok, no pumpkin filling)

Raspberries

Strawberries

Watermelon (remove skin, rind, and seeds)

Carrots
Peas

Green beans
Sweet potatoes

 


Meats - cooked, bones removed as these can be choking hazards

Protein is a very important part of your pet’s nutrition

 

Chicken

Fish

Pork

Lean beef

Cold cuts

Eggs



Dairy - (most cats are lactose intolerant and like humans, dogs can be too, so check with your vet, especially with this category)


Yogurt - in moderation

Cheese - good in hard cheeses or cottage cheese

Ice cream (no to chocolate or anything with artificial sweeteners)

 

 

Grains

 

Bread

Rice

Corn

Quinoa

Oatmeal



More treats:


Popcorn (unsalted and unflavoured)
Peanut butter—be sure the brand you select does not contain xylitol or added sugar

Coconut

Honey

Foods that are poisonous to your pets

 

Grapes

Chocolate

Avocados

Onions

Garlic

Macadamia nuts

Yeast

Lemons and limes

Coffee

Tea (anything with caffeine in it)

Anything containing Xylitol

Cinnamon
Tomatoes (contain solanine which is toxic to cats and harmful to dogs)

 

 As with human daily nutrition, every food and treat is great in moderation, especially for pets. Keep things unseasoned, no sugar, no artificial sweeteners, and fresh, meats cooked.

Keep a close eye on your pet if you do feed them new foods and check with your vet beforehand if certain foods are ok. And when in doubt, give your pets their regular foods with the occasional treats, which you can also find here!: https://humblelittlepets.com/collections/treats

 

  1. Photo by Eszter Naujoks on Unsplash
  2. Photo by Marek Szturc on Unsplash
  3. Photo by Alfr DLu on Unsplash
  4. Photo by Callum Blacoe on Unsplash
  5. Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash
  6. Photo by Tamas Pap on Unsplash